The potager shed

The potager shed

Hi.

Welcome to my blog. This is just my personal garden and food diary. I’m a flexitarian, vegetarian at home, but more flexible when with friends. I’m trying to grow our own food so we leave a lighter footprint on this precious planet.

Over the past six years I have been transforming a one acre former vineyard on a steep hill into a garden. There are distinct areas; an 80m2 vegetable garden, a small orchard, a pond and a sunken path flanked by two long mixed borders.

We are in a small hamlet near Faugères in the Occitanie (formerly Languedoc) region of France. Our soil is rocky schist. Summer temperatures can reach 40℃ and in winter sink as low as -10℃. Water comes rarely but is diluvial when it does.

Lizzie

Hexagonal planting

Hexagonal planting

Supposing you have 32 plants to put in a square bed. You’d plant them in rows normally wouldn’t you? It makes for easy hoeing, keeps everything orderly and that’s what everyone’s always done.

However, if you were to plant them in a hexagonal pattern you’d get the same number of plants in the space, but each plant would have more room to grow until it encroached on the plants beside it. This makes for bigger plants from that wonderful compost you’ve given them. Furthermore, their leaves would create a natural shade over the soil below resulting in less evaporation. Hoeing is no more difficult, you just have to do it on the diagonal instead of straight up and down. Why not give it a whirl and see if my theory holds true?

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It’s difficult to see in this photograph because there are several different types of lettuce, all different colours and ages too. However, you can see that as each one grows it will have good space to grow into and once fully grown you won’t see the soil beneath at all.

Today I was listening to Engleby by Sebastian Faulks. Excellent listening.

Beetroot, peanut & avocado wrap

Beetroot, peanut & avocado wrap

Basil tip

Basil tip